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How Networks are Built

“The Dean of Nursing at the time connected us at a conference. I may never have had this opportunity if it was not for the faculty at UB networking and advocating for me.”
Meghan Underhill, School of Nursing
Hamburg, NY

Learn how UB's global network and School of Nursing propelled Meghan Underhill's career

As an instructor at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Meghan Underhill is focused on improving patient outcomes for healthy women at risk for hereditary breast cancer. Her research is designed to understand these women’s experiences, and how they can make better health-related decisions.  

Dr. Underhill met her director at Dana Farber thanks to a networking opportunity through UB. “The Dean of Nursing at the time connected us at a conference,” explains Meghan. “I may never have had this opportunity if it was not for the faculty at UB networking and advocating for me.”

Meghan initially started her UB career as an undergraduate English major. But after taking a few science courses, she realized that she was more interested in nursing. “There are a lot of different opportunities within the field of nursing,” she says. “You can be at the bedside, but you can also teach and do research.”

When Meghan was accepted into the nursing doctorate program at UB, it did not take her long to decide what to do. “I liked the program because it was community-oriented, and taught by expert clinicians and researchers who were well-respected in Western New York and nationally, which was important for my work,” she explained.

During her graduate studies at UB, Meghan took advantage of numerous educational opportunities outside of the classroom. A collaboration between UB and Roswell Park Cancer Institute allowed Meghan to participate with the oncology research team. Meghan also worked as a research assistant at UB’s Center of Nursing Research. “It is great for a doctoral student because you get to see what you are going to be doing when you graduate. Because of my experience, I knew what a research-intensive profession looked like. I knew about grant needs, the importance of funding and more.”

As Meghan explains, UB is “a small enough school where you can know all the faculty and have that one-on-one support, but it is big enough where you can find all the opportunities whether they are in Buffalo, Boston or anywhere in the world.”

Did You Know?

High-tech patient simulators in our School of Nursing allow students to practice life-saving techniques without putting real patients at risk